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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah found in the catalog.

Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah

Specialty Conference on Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah (1984 Utah State University)

Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah

proceedings of a specialty conference held at Utah State University, Logan, Utah, June 14-15, 1984

by Specialty Conference on Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah (1984 Utah State University)

  • 234 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Utah State University in Logan, UT .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Landslides -- Utah -- Congresses.,
  • Slopes (Soil mechanics) -- Utah -- Congresses.,
  • Floods -- Utah -- Congresses.,
  • Geophysical prediction -- Congresses.,
  • Hydrological forecasting -- Utah -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by David S. Bowles.
    GenreCongresses.
    SeriesGeneral series (Utah Water Research Laboratory) -- 85/03
    ContributionsBowles, David S., Utah Water Research Laboratory.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQE"599"U5"S74"1984
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[14], 592 p. :
    Number of Pages592
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19833326M

    In D. S. Bowles Ed., Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah UWRL/G/03 ed., pp. Logan, UT: Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah State University. Google Scholar; Keaton, J. R. A probabilistic model for hazards related to sedimentation processes on alluvial fans in Davis County, : W HernandezMichael. citizens of Utah are at risk to a wide array of natural hazard events including weather-related events, floods, dam failures, snow avalanches, earthquakes, slope failures, landslides, wildfires, radon gas exposure, and drought. Utah’s Natural Hazards Throughout the last decade, Utah has experienced numerous hazard events. TheFile Size: 6MB.

    Heavily sediment-laden flows have been described and classified as hyperconcentrated sediment flows, including mud floods, mudflows, and debris Cited by: The Utah Geological Survey documents and evaluates geologic hazards such as debris flows to protect citizens of Utah. If you wish to report a debris flow or other landslide, or want more information, please contact the Utah Geological Survey at: Utah Geological Survey, PO Box , Salt Lake City, UT , phone

    Conference on Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, June , , 21pp. Book Cliffs Coal Mining Region, Central Utah, USA. Warner, J.W., P.J. Phipps, M.K. McCarter and K.L. Pankow, Monitoring Post Collapse Seismicity – An Analysis of Crandall Canyon Events. "Physical properties and mechanics of hyperconcentrated sediment flows," in Delineation of landslide, flash flood and debris flow hazards in Utah, UWRL/G/03, Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Schamber, D.R., and MacArthur, R.C. ().


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Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah by Specialty Conference on Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah (1984 Utah State University) Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract. During, andabnormally wet conditions in Utah triggered flash floods, landslides, and debris flows. Pore pressures built in hillside soils below melting snows and during prolonged periods of rainfall until the mass suddenly gave way, sometimes as a landslide and other times as a non-Newtonian debris flow Cited by: Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood, and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah [Utah Water Research Laboratory, David S.

Bowles] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Book has previous owner's name on the fore edge. Title page and one other have a few crayon markings. Good condition otherwise. Delineation of landslide, flash flood, and debris flow hazards in Utah: proceedings of a specialty conference held at Utah State University, Logan, Utah, June through flood-hazard areas.

The high flood hazard results from the complex interaction of the area s rugged topography and southwestern Utah s seasonal weather patterns. Three types of floods typically occur in the study area: (1) riverine (stream) floods, (2) flash floods/debris flows, and (3) sheetfloods.

In Proceedings, Specialty Conference on Delineation of Landslides, Flash Flood and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah. Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State Univ., Logan, Utah, pp. – Google ScholarCited by: 9. The Utah landslide, debris flows, and floods of May and Junein: Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood, and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah, edited by: Bowles, D.

S., Utah Water Research. Debris flows in history. Authors; Authors and affiliations D.S. () Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood, and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah: Specialty Conference ( pp.).

Utah State University, Logan. Google Scholar () The extent and economic significance of the debris flow and landslide problem in Kazakhstan. In: E.E. Brabb and Cited by: Geologic hazards that affect Utah include earthquakes, landslides, flooding, problem soils and rocks, and volcanic hazards.

Hazards resulting from earthquakes, such as ground shaking, liquefaction, surface fault rupture, tsunamis, and tectonic subsidence. McCarter, M.K. and Kaliser, B.N. () Prototype instrumentation and monitoring programs for measuring surface deformation associated with landslide processes.

In: D.S. Bowles (ed.), Proceedings of a Specialty Conference on Delineation of Landslide, Flash Flood, and Debris Flow Hazards in Utah (pp. 30–49).

Utah State University, Logan, by: Application of simulation technique on debris flow hazard zone delineation: A case study in the Daniao tribe, Eastern Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, –, Abstracts of specialty conference papers; delineation of landslide, flash flood and debris flow hazards in Utah.

McCarter, M. K.; Pack, R.; and Newman, J., "Abstracts of specialty conference papers; delineation of landslide, flash flood and debris flow hazards in Utah" (). Reports.

Paper Author: B. Kaliser, M. McCarter, R. Pack, J. Newman. Amazing Flash Flood / Debris Flow Southern Utah HD - Duration: rankinstudio 7, views. Flash Floods in May. 5 Massive Landslides CAUGHT ON CAMERA - Duration: Magnitude and frequency of debris flows, J.

Hydrol., Debris flows periodically result in the loss of lives and property. Engineering structures designed to control debris flows are often inadequate because of lack of knowledge of the magnitude of debris by: Workshop on World Landslide Forum WLF Advancing Culture of Living with Landslides pp | Cite as Characterization and Modeling of a Debris Flow in a Dolomitic Basin: Results and IssuesAuthor: Chiara Boccali, Romano Lapasin, Luca Zini, Chiara Calligaris, Franco Cucchi.

The geomorphology of some debris flows in the southern Sierra Nevada, California, Geomorphology, 10, –, 12 DeGraff, J. V.: The dilemma of transforming landslide hazard maps into effective policy and regulation, Geol.

Soc. Amer. Abstr. LANDSLIDE PROCESSES IN UTAH-OBSERVATION AND THEORY Landslides and Debris Flows in Ephraim Canyon, Central Utah By Rex L Baum1 and Robert W. Fleming1 Abstract Landslides and debris flows occurred in bedrock and surficial deposits of Ephraim Canyon, on the west side of the Wasatch Plateau, in central Utah, during the spring of Cited by: 2.

Tom's field-based research focuses primarily on volcano hazards involving the mobilization and rapid movement of rock debris, ice, and water mixtures down the flanks of volcanoes—lahars, debris avalanches, and floods.

Other hazards, such as flash floods and debris flows, now become the focus. Areas recently burned by wildfires are particularly susceptible to flash floods and debris flows during rainstorms. Attribution: Natural Hazards, Landslide Hazards Program, Geologic Hazards Science Center.

Hazards in Utah Potential Disasters. Because of its varying climate and terrain, Utah can experience a variety of disasters. Wildfires can strike during the hot, dry summer months and severe storms during the winter season can blanket parts of the state, causing power outages and increased avalanche danger.

Landslide & Debris Flow Landslide and Debris Flow (Mudslide) Landslides are a serious geologic hazard common to almost every state in the United States. It is estimated that nationally they cause up to $2 billion in damages and from 25 to 50 deaths annually.

which may occur after a landslide or debris flow. Floods sometimes follow. First there was fire. Then rain. And now deadly debris flows are devastating Montecito, California.

More than a dozen people are missing or dead, and at least homes have been damaged or destroyed by fast-moving floods that swept mud, rocks, and charred wood left exposed by the Thomas fire.

The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired natural-color imagery. Debris flow video courtesy of Sue Cannon, landslide researcher with the US Geological Survey in Denver, Colorado. This video was taken by a television crew from Denver next to Interstate 70 near.Landslide hazards have resulted in at least fatalities in Utah sincewith 90 percent of those deaths from snow avalanches and 10 percent from landslides, rockfalls, and debris flows.

While nearly all the recorded deaths since have been caused by human-triggered avalanches, many of these events have occurred in developed areas where appropriate mitigation measures .